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Buspirone-10

(buspirone HCl)

How does this medication work? What will it do for me?

Buspirone belongs to the class of medications called anxiolytics, or anti-anxiety medications. Buspirone is used for the short-term relief of excessive anxiety for people with generalized anxiety disorder. Generalized anxiety disorder is believed to be caused by imbalances in certain brain chemicals. This medication works by bringing these chemicals back into balance.

Buspirone is not used for everyday anxiety and stress.
This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here.

Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor.
Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it.

How should I use this medication?

The recommended dose starts at 5 mg 2 or 3 times daily. This may be increased by 5 mg every 2 to 3 days to a maximum of 45 mg daily in divided doses as directed by the doctor.

Many things can affect the dose of medication that a person needs, such as body weight, other medical conditions, and other medications. If your doctor has recommended a dose different from the ones listed here, do not change the way that you are taking the medication without consulting your doctor.

It is important to take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. If you miss a dose, take it as soon as possible and continue with your regular schedule. If it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and continue with your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you are not sure what to do after missing a dose, contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice.

Store this medication at room temperature, protect it from light and moisture, ad keep it out of the reach of children.

Do not dispose of medications in wastewater (e.g. down the sink or in the toilet) or in household garbage. Ask your pharmacist how to dispose of medications that are no longer needed or have expired.

What form(s) does this medication come in?

Each white, pillow-shaped, scored tablet, engraved "BU 10" on one side and "APO" on the other, contains 10 mg of buspirone hydrochloride. Nonmedicinal ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, lactose, magnesium stearate and microcrystalline cellulose.

Who should NOT take this medication?

Do not take this medication if you:

  • are allergic to buspirone or any ingredients of this medication
  • are taking a MAO inhibitor (e.g., phenelzine, tranylcypromine, moclobemide) or have taken a MAO inhibitor within the last 14 days
  • have severe kidney impairment
  • have severe liver impairment

What side effects are possible with this medication?

Many medications can cause side effects. A side effect is an unwanted response to a medication when it is taken in normal doses. Side effects can be mild or severe, temporary or permanent.

The side effects listed below are not experienced by everyone who takes this medication. If you are concerned about side effects, discuss the risks and benefits of this medication with your doctor.

The following side effects have been reported by at least 1% of people taking this medication. Many of these side effects can be managed, and some may go away on their own over time.

Contact your doctor if you experience these side effects and they are severe or bothersome. Your pharmacist may be able to advise you on managing side effects.

  • blurred vision
  • constipation
  • decreased sexual ability or interest
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • falls and injuries from falls
  • headache
  • joint pain
  • lightheadedness
  • muscle cramps or spasms
  • nausea
  • nervousness
  • ringing in the ears
  • sore, itchy, red eyes
  • stiff neck or jaw
  • sweating or clamminess
  • trouble concentrating
  • trouble sleeping
  • vomiting

Although most of the side effects listed below don't happen very often, they could lead to serious problems if you do not seek medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

  • chest pain
  • changed pattern of menstrual bleeding
  • confusion
  • dizziness or lightheadedness when rising from a sitting or lying position
  • fainting
  • increased need to urinate at night
  • painful blisters on the skin
  • rapid, pounding heartbeat
  • signs of clotting problems (e.g., unusual nosebleeds, bruising, blood in urine, coughing blood, bleeding gums, cuts that don’t stop bleeding)
  • signs of depression (e.g., poor concentration, changes in weight, changes in sleep, decreased interest in activities, thoughts of suicide)
  • signs of infection (symptoms may include fever or chills, severe diarrhea, shortness of breath, prolonged dizziness, headache, stiff neck, weight loss, or listlessness)
  • symptoms of high blood pressure (e.g., dizziness or fainting, chest pain or pressure, shortness of breath, swelling in ankles and legs, bluish colour to lips and skin)
  • symptoms of increased numbers of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell; abdominal pain, rash, weight loss, wheezing)
  • symptoms of rectal bleeding (e.g., black, tarry stool, blood in the stool)
  • symptoms of serotonin toxicity (e.g., confusion, fast heartbeat, hallucinations, restlessness, shaking, shivering, sudden jerking of muscles, sweating)
  • symptoms of thyroid problems (e.g., body aches, low blood pressure, body aches, lightheadedness, unexplained weight loss)
  • symptoms of withdrawal (e.g., stomach cramps, trouble remembering, diarrhea, anxiety or panic attacks, headache, sensitivity to light)

Stop taking the medication and seek immediate medical attention if any of the following occur:

  • serious symptoms of withdrawal (e.g., seizures, feeling like you cannot move, severe confusion, feeling depressed, feeling disconnected from reality)
  • signs of a heart attack (e.g., chest pain or pressure, pain extending through shoulder and arm, nausea and vomiting, sweating)
  • signs of an allergic reaction (e.g., difficulty breathing, hives, swelling of the face or throat)
  • signs of heart problems (e.g., fast, irregular heartbeat or pulse, chest pain, sudden weight gain, difficulty breathing, leg swelling)
  • signs of stroke (e.g., sudden or severe headache; sudden loss of coordination; vision changes; sudden slurring of speech; or unexplained weakness, numbness, or pain in arm or leg)
  • slow, shallow, or weak breathing
  • symptoms of overdose (e.g., extreme sleepiness, confusion, slow, shallow breathing, loss of balance and coordination, low blood pressure)

Some people may experience side effects other than those listed. Check with your doctor if you notice any symptom that worries you while you are taking this medication.

Are there any other precautions or warnings for this medication?

Before you begin using a medication, be sure to inform your doctor of any medical conditions or allergies you may have, any medications you are taking, whether you are pregnant or breast-feeding, and any other significant facts about your health. These factors may affect how you should use this medication.

Alcohol and other medications that cause drowsiness: Alcohol and other medications that cause drowsiness, such as antidepressants, sleeping pills, anxiety medications, or narcotic pain relievers, should be avoided when you are taking diazepam. Combining any of these medications with buspirone can result in severe drowsiness, breathing problems, and possibly coma and death. People who have an addiction to alcohol or other medications should not take buspirone, except in rare situations under medical supervision.

Dependence and withdrawal: Physical dependence (a need to take regular doses to prevent physical symptoms) has been associated with buspirone. Severe withdrawal symptoms may occur if the dose is significantly reduced or suddenly discontinued. Symptoms can include irritability, nervousness, sleep problems, agitation, tremors, diarrhea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, memory impairment, headache, muscle pain, extreme anxiety, tension, restlessness, confusion, and seizures. Reducing the dose gradually under medical supervision can help prevent or decrease these withdrawal symptoms.

Drowsiness/reduced alertness: This medication may impair the mental or physical abilities required for certain tasks, such as driving a car or operating machinery. Do not drive or operate dangerous machinery while using this medication until you have determined how this medication affects you.

Falls and fractures: Buspirone can cause drowsiness or dizziness that can affect your balance and increase your risk of falling. This can result in fractures or other injuries. Your risk of falls is increased if you drink alcohol or take other sedatives while taking this medication, are elderly, or have a condition that causes weakness or frailty.

Kidney function: The kidneys are involved in removing buspirone from the body. People with reduced kidney function may experience increased side effects of buspirone as a result of it not being removed as quickly as expected.

If you have kidney disease or reduced kidney function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Lactose intolerance: This medication contains lactose. If you have galactose intolerance (galactosemia, glucose-galactose malabsorption, or Lapp lactase deficiency) you should not take this medication. Talk to your doctor about other alternatives.

Liver function: Buspirone is broken down by the liver so it can be removed from the body through the kidneys. Liver disease or reduced liver function may cause a build-up of buspirone in the body and cause side effects.

If you have liver disease or decreased liver function, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Seizures: The safety and effectiveness of buspirone when taken by someone with a seizure disorder have not been determined. If you have a seizure disorder or a history of seizure disorders you should not take this medication.

If you have a seizure disorder, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Serotonin toxicity: Severe reactions are possible when buspirone is combined with other medications that act on serotonin, such as tricyclic antidepressants and serotonin reuptake inhibitors, medications used to treat depression. Symptoms of a reaction may include muscle rigidity and spasms, difficulty moving, changes in mental state including delirium and agitation. Coma and death are possible.

If you are taking antidepressants, discuss with your doctor how this medication may affect your medical condition, how your medical condition may affect the dosing and effectiveness of this medication, and whether any special monitoring is needed.

Stopping the medication: If this medication needs to be stopped, it should be done gradually, under the supervision of your doctor. Suddenly stopping buspirone can cause abdominal cramps, diarrhea, anxiety, and difficulty sleeping. Severe symptoms of withdrawal can include seizures, depression and rebound anxiety.

Pregnancy: This medication should not be used during pregnancy unless the benefits outweigh the risks. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, contact your doctor immediately.

Breast-feeding: It is not known if buspirone passes into breast milk. If you are breast-feeding and taking this medication, it may affect your baby. Talk to your doctor about whether you should continue breast-feeding.

Children: The safety and effectiveness of buspirone have not been established for those under 18 years of age.

Seniors: Seniors may be more likely to experience side effects of buspirone as a result of decreased kidney and liver function. Long term use of buspirone should be avoided.

What other drugs could interact with this medication?

For a full list of interactions, use the Drug Interaction Checker available on the Drugs.com website.

If you are taking other medications, speak with your doctor or pharmacist. Depending on your specific circumstances, your doctor may want you to:

  • stop taking one of the medications,
  • change one of the medications to another,
  • change how you are taking one or both of the medications, or
  • leave everything as is.

An interaction between two medications does not always mean that you must stop taking one of them. Speak to your doctor about how any drug interactions are being managed or should be managed.

Tell your doctor or prescriber about all prescription, over-the-counter (non-prescription), and herbal medications you are taking. Also tell them about any supplements you take. Since caffeine, alcohol, the nicotine from cigarettes, or street drugs can affect the action of many medications, you should let your prescriber know if you use them.

All material copyright MediResource Inc. 1996 – 2024. Terms and conditions of use. The contents herein are for informational purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Source: www.medbroadcast.com/drug/getdrug/Buspirone-10

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